DS18B20 Digital Thermometer

DESCRIPTION

The DS18B20 Digital Thermometer provides 9 to 12–bit centigrade temperature measurements and has an alarm function with nonvolatile user-programmable upper and lower trigger points. The DS18B20 communicates over a 1-Wire bus that by definition requires only one data line (and ground) for communication with a central microprocessor. It has an operating temperature range of –55°C to +125°C and is accurate to ±0.5°C over the range of –10°C to +85°C The DS18B20 can be powered by an external supply on the VDD pin, or it can operate in “parasite power” mode, which allows the DS18B20 to function without a local external supply. In parasite power mode the DS18B20 can derive power directly from the data line. Power is supplied through the 1-Wire pullup resistor through the DQ pin when the bus is high. The high bus signal also charges an internal capacitor (Cpp), which then supplies power to the device when the bus is low. (More details in DS18B20 datasheet).
Each DS18B20 has a unique 64-bit serial code, which allows multiple DS18B20s to function on the same 1–wire bus; thus, it is simple to use one microprocessor to control many DS18B20s distributed over a large area.

OVERVIEW

The DS18B20 has 64-bit ROM which stores the device’s unique serial code. It has scratchpad SRAM memory which contains the 2-byte temperature register that stores the digital output from the temperature sensor. In addition, the scratchpad provides access to the 1-byte upper and lower alarm trigger registers (TH and TL), and the 1-byte configuration register. The configuration register allows the user to set the resolution of the temperature-to-digital conversion to 9, 10, 11, or 12 bits. The TH, TL and configuration registers are stored in nonvolatile EEPROM with specifics commands, so they will retain data when the device is powered down.
The DS18B20 uses Dallas’ exclusive 1-Wire bus protocol that implements bus communication using one control signal. The control line requires a weak pullup resistor since all devices are linked to the bus via a 3-state or open-drain port (the DQ pin in the case of the DS18B20). In this bus system, the microprocessor (the master device) identifies and addresses devices on the bus using each device’s unique 64-bit code. Because each device has a unique code, the number of devices that can be addressed on one bus is virtually unlimited.

OPERATION – MEASURING TEMPERATURE

The core functionality of the DS18B20 is its direct-to-digital temperature sensor. The resolution of the temperature sensor is user-configurable to 9, 10, 11, or 12 bits, corresponding to increments of 0.5°C, 0.25°C, 0.125°C, and 0.0625°C, respectively. The default resolution at power-up is 12-bit. The DS18B20 powers-up in a low-power idle state; to initiate a temperature measurement and A-to-D conversion, the master must issue a Convert T [44h] command. Following the conversion, the resulting thermal data is stored in the 2-byte temperature register in the scratchpad memory and the DS18B20 returns to its idle state. If the DS18B20 is powered by an external supply, the master can issue “read time slots” after the Convert T command and the DS18B20 will respond by transmitting 0 while the temperature conversion is in progress and 1 when the conversion is done. This does not apply in parasite power mode because the bus must be pulled high by a strong pullup during the entire temperature conversion.
The DS18B20 output temperature data is calibrated in degrees centigrade; for Fahrenheit applications, a lookup table or conversion routine must be used. The temperature data is stored as a 16-bit sign-extended two’s complement number in the temperature register (see Figure 2). The sign bits (S) indicate if the temperature is positive or negative: for positive numbers S = 0 and for negative numbers S = 1. If the DS18B20 is configured for 12-bit resolution, all bits in the temperature register will contain valid data. For 11-bit resolution, bit 0 is undefined. For 10-bit resolution, bits 1 and 0 are undefined, and for 9-bit resolution bits 2, 1 and 0 are undefined.

OPERATION – ALARM SIGNALING

After the DS18B20 performs a temperature conversion, the temperature value is compared to the user-defined two’s complement alarm trigger values stored in the 1-byte TH and TL registers (see Figure 3). The sign bit (S) indicates if the value is positive or negative: for positive numbers S = 0 and for negative numbers S = 1. The TH and TL registers are nonvolatile (EEPROM) and can be accessed through bytes 2 and 3 of the scratchpad. More details on how the master device can check the alarm flag of all DS18B20s on the bus, you can find on DS18B20’s datasheet.

64-BIT LASER ROM CODE

Each DS18B20 contains a unique 64–bit code stored in ROM. The least significant 8 bits of this 16-bit code contain the DS18B20’s 1-Wire family code: 28h. The next 48 bits contain a unique serial number. The most significant 8 bits contain a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) byte that is calculated from the first 56 bits of the ROM code. A detailed explanation of the CRC bits you can find on DS18B20’s datasheet.

MEMORY

The DS18B20’s memory is organized as shown in Figure 7. The memory consists of an SRAM scratchpad. There is also the nonvolatile EEPROM storage for the high and low alarm trigger registers (TH and TL) and configuration register. Note that if the DS18B20 alarm function is not used, the TH and TL registers can serve as general-purpose memory.
Byte 0 and byte 1 of the scratchpad contain the LSB and the MSB of the temperature register, respectively. These bytes are read-only. Bytes 2 and 3 provide access to TH and TL registers. Byte 4 contains the configuration register data. Bytes 5, 6, and 7 are reserved for internal use by the device and cannot be overwritten; these bytes will return all 1s when read.
Byte 8 of the scratchpad is read-only and contains the cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code for bytes 0 through 7 of the scratchpad.

Data is written to bytes 2, 3, and 4 of the scratchpad using the Write Scratchpad [4Eh] command; the data must be transmitted to the DS18B20 starting with the least significant bit of byte 2. To verify data integrity, the scratchpad can be read (using the Read Scratchpad [BEh] command) after the data is written. When reading the scratchpad, data is transferred over the 1-Wire bus starting with the least significant bit of byte 0. To transfer the TH, TL and configuration data from the scratchpad to EEPROM, the master must issue the Copy Scratchpad [48h] command.
Data in the EEPROM registers is retained when the device is powered down; at power-up the EEPROM data is reloaded into the corresponding scratchpad locations. Data can also be reloaded from EEPROM to the scratchpad at any time using the Recall E2 [B8h] command. The master can issue read time slots following the Recall E2 command and the DS18B20 will indicate the status of the recall by transmitting 0 while the recall is in progress and 1 when the recall is done.

CONFIGURATION REGISTER

Byte 4 of the scratchpad memory contains the configuration register, which is organized as illustrated in Figure 8. The user can set the conversion resolution of the DS18B20 using the R0 and R1 bits in this register as shown in Table 3. The power-up default of these bits is R0 = 1 and R1 = 1 (12-bit resolution). Note that there is a direct tradeoff between resolution and conversion time. Bit 7 and bits 0 to 4 in the configuration register are reserved for internal use by the device and cannot be overwritten.

CRC GENERATION

CRC bytes are provided as part of the DS18B20’s 64-bit ROM code and in the 9th byte of the scratchpad memory. The ROM code CRC is calculated from the first 56 bits of the ROM code and is contained in the most significant byte of the ROM. The scratchpad CRC is calculated from the data stored in the scratchpad, and therefore it changes when the data in the scratchpad changes. The CRCs provide the bus master with a method of data validation when data is read from the DS18B20. You can find how to calculate CRCs on DS18B20’s datasheet.

1-WIRE BUS SYSTEM

The 1-Wire bus system uses a single bus master to control one or more slave devices. The DS18B20 is always a slave. When there is only one slave on the bus, the system is referred to as a “single-drop” system; the system is “multidrop” if there are multiple slaves on the bus.
All data and commands are transmitted least significant bit first over the 1-Wire bus.
The following discussion of the 1-Wire bus system is broken down into three topics: hardware configuration, transaction sequence, and 1-Wire signaling (signal types and timing).

HARDWARE CONFIGURATION

The 1-Wire bus has by definition only a single data line. Each device (master or slave) interfaces to the data line via an open-drain or 3-state port. This allows each device to “release” the data line when the device is not transmitting data so the bus is available for use by another device. The 1-Wire port of the DS18B20 (the DQ pin) is open drain with an internal circuit equivalent to that shown in Figure 10.
The 1-Wire bus requires an external pullup resistor of approximately 5kΩ; thus, the idle state for the 1- Wire bus is high. If for any reason a transaction needs to be suspended, the bus MUST be left in the idle state if the transaction is to resume. Infinite recovery time can occur between bits so long as the 1-Wire bus is in the inactive (high) state during the recovery period. If the bus is held low for more than 480μs, all components on the bus will be reset.

TRANSACTION SEQUENCE

The transaction sequence for accessing the DS18B20 is as follows:
Step 1, Initialization
Step 2. ROM Command (followed by any required data exchange)
Step 3. DS18B20 Function Command (followed by any required data exchange)
It is very important to follow this sequence every time the DS18B20 is accessed, as the DS18B20 will not respond if any steps in the sequence are missing or out of order. Exceptions to this rule are the Search ROM [F0h] and Alarm Search [ECh] commands. After issuing either of these ROM commands, the master must return to Step 1 in the sequence.

INITIALIZATION (Step 1)

All transactions on the 1-Wire bus begin with an initialization sequence. The initialization sequence consists of a reset pulse transmitted by the bus master followed by presence pulse(s) transmitted by the slave(s). The presence pulse lets the bus master know that slave devices (such as the DS18B20) are on the bus and are ready to operate.

ROM COMMANDS (Step 2)

After the bus master has detected a presence pulse, it can issue a ROM command. These commands operate on the unique 64-bit ROM codes of each slave device and allow the master to single out a specific device if many are present on the 1-Wire bus. These commands also allow the master to determine how many and what types of devices are present on the bus or if any device has experienced an alarm condition. There are five ROM commands, and each command is 8 bits long. The master device must issue an appropriate ROM command before issuing a DS18B20 function command.

Search Rom [F0h]
When a system is initially powered up, the master must identify the ROM codes of all slave devices on the bus, which allows the master to determine the number of slaves and their device types. This can be done by the SEARCH ROM[F0h] command. More details you can find on DS18B20’s datasheet.

Read Rom [33h]
The command READ ROM [33h] can only be used when there is one slave on the bus. It allows the bus master to read the slave’s 64-bit ROM code without using the Search ROM procedure. If this command is used when there is more than one slave present on the bus, a data collision will occur when all the slaves attempt to respond at the same time.

Match Rom [55h]
The MATCH ROM [55h] command followed by a 64-bit ROM code sequence allows the bus master to address a specific slave device on a multidrop or single-drop bus. Only the slave that exactly matches the 64-bit ROM code sequence will respond to the function command issued by the master; all other slaves on the bus will wait for a reset pulse.

Skip Rom [CCh]
The master can use the SKIP ROM[CCh] command to address all devices on the bus simultaneously without sending out any ROM code information. For example, the master can make all DS18B20s on the bus perform simultaneous temperature conversions by issuing a Skip ROM command followed by a Convert T [44h] command.

Note that the Read Scratchpad [BEh] command can follow the Skip ROM command only if there is a single slave device on the bus. In this case time is saved by allowing the master to read from the slave without sending the device’s 64-bit ROM code. A Skip ROM command followed by a Read Scratchpad command will cause a data collision on the bus if there is more than one slave since multiple devices will attempt to transmit data simultaneously.

DS18B20 FUNCTION COMMANDS (Step 3)

After the bus master has used a ROM command to address the DS18B20 with which it wishes to communicate, the master can issue one of the DS18B20 function commands. These commands allow the master to write to and read from the DS18B20’s scratchpad memory, initiate temperature conversions and determine the power supply mode.

Convert T [44h]
This command initiates a single temperature conversion. Following the conversion, the resulting thermal data is stored in the 2-byte temperature register in the scratchpad memory and the DS18B20 returns to its low-power idle state. If the DS18B20 is powered by an external supply, the master can issue read time slots after the Convert T command and the DS18B20 will respond by transmitting a 0 while the temperature conversion is in progress and a 1 when the conversion is done. In parasite power mode this notification technique cannot be used since the bus is pulled high by the strong pullup during the conversion.

Write Scratchpad [4Eh]
This command allows the master to write 3 bytes of data to the DS18B20’s scratchpad. The first data byte is written into the TH register (byte 2 of the scratchpad), the second byte is written into the TL register (byte 3), and the third byte is written into the configuration register (byte 4). Data must be transmitted least significant bit first. All three bytes MUST be written before the master issues a reset, or the data may be corrupted.

Read Scratchpad [BEh]
This command allows the master to read the contents of the scratchpad. The data transfer starts with the least significant bit of byte 0 and continues through the scratchpad until the 9th byte (byte 8 – CRC) is read. The master may issue a reset to terminate reading at any time if only part of the scratchpad data is needed.

Copy Scratchpad [48h]
This command copies the contents of the scratchpad TH, TL and configuration registers (bytes 2, 3 and 4) to EEPROM. If the device is being used in parasite power mode, within 10μs (max) after this command is issued the master must enable a strong pullup on the 1-Wire bus for at least 10ms.

Recall E2 [B8h]
This command recalls the alarm trigger values (TH and TL) and configuration data from EEPROM and places the data in bytes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, in the scratchpad memory. The master device can issue read time slots following the Recall E2 command and the DS18B20 will indicate the status of the recall by transmitting 0 while the recall is in progress and 1 when the recall is done. The recall operation happens automatically at power-up, so valid data is available in the scratchpad as soon as power is applied to the device.

Read Power Supply [B4h]
The master device issues this command followed by a read time slot to determine if any DS18B20s on the bus are using parasite power. During the read time slot, parasite powered DS18B20s will pull the bus low, and externally powered DS18B20s will let the bus remain high. If the bus is pulled low, the master knows that it must supply the strong pullup on the 1-Wire bus during temperature conversions. (See at DS18B20’s datasheet.)